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Keeping Dogs Safe in the Home

Some tips on keeping dogs, and other pets, safe in your home.


This week brings National Safe at Home Week, which was created to remind people about keeping their home a safe place for adults, children and pets. We share some tips on make sure your house is safe for all of your pets.

Periodically, review your home room by room, as well as your yard and other outdoor areas, to make sure that no safety hazards are available, such as exposed wires, chemicals and medications out in the open, or faulty gate locks or broken yard or pool fences. Are your garbage cans secure and dog-proof?

Some toxic items in the home to look for include:

  • Asbestos
  • Cleaning solutions
  • Antifreeze
  • Certain types of food (onions, chocolate, cooked bones, grapes, raisins, coffee, alcohol and more. Check here for a larger list.)
  • Certain household plants (lilies, azalea, Dieffenbachia, sago palms, Japanese yew, oleander and more. View a more comprehensive list.)
  • Insecticides

If you have a dog that likes to get into cabinets and closets, consider using child safety locks or latches that can keep the doors closed.

Another area pet owners sometimes miss is keeping their toilet lids always closed. Some cleaning chemicals used continuously in toilets to keep the water clear can be poisonous to pets.

Exposed wires are a hazard if your dog is a chewer who finds these attractive items. Using PVC pipe or wire covers, or duct tape can keep these away from your dogs mouth and paws. 

Make sure you have fire safety stickers on your windows that will notify fireman, as well as other emergency responders, that you have pets inside in case something happens to you or your home. Also have a friend or relative designated to help you with your pet in case you become incapacitated.

Some important numbers to keep on hand in your phone include:

  • National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC)  888-426-4435
  • Pet Poison Helpline  855-764-7661
  • The number for your regular veterinarian
  • The number for your local emergency veterinarian
  • NAPCC also has a mobile app with tons of information on poisoning.
  • Your local animal control and shelter, in case your pet bolts from the house during a fire or other incident, or passes through an unlocked or damaged gate or fence.

Other informational websites:

Photo credit: Contemplating the meaning of life via photopin (license)

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