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The Snooker Course

First of the Team Tournament classes to run on Thursday was Snooker.


The team snooker course offered its challenges with multiple combinations and four reds.  Time utilization would be a factor, as well as how to maximize points, since the number 7 combination was long, if not difficult, due to its "fishing hook" nature. 

With a strict flow rule in the briefing (i.e., forward or reverse flow in the opening sequence), the #7 was made much more difficult to include in a plan. Following was reported on the Event Blog by competitor Karey Krauter:

Good course with lots of different approaches used (I love it when everyone doesn't do the same thing).  There were many that were whistled off because they didn't realize the full implications of the rule that combos had to be done either fully forward or fully (and exactly) backward, although by halfway through the day those tapered off.  I think I saw the (winning?  close to?) run by Nancy Gyes and Ace in 22" in which they did 2 sixes and 2 sevens and finished with less than a half-second to spare.  A couple earlier dogs did the same and ran out of time in the final seven - you couldn't be careful and still make time!  I think I'm supposed to do my course analysis over on the news and events www.usdaa.com page - I'll get to it.  One thing that kept impressing me was the complexity of the plans people were coming up with, that took them to all corners of the ring (how did they remember? and yes many of the complex plans worked).  Not just "all sevens".  How did I do?  Bump's two teammates did 4-6-7-2 and finished in time, with one even in the top 15 of the class.  Bump did same but I dropped a bar on the 6 in the closing.  Better than zero!  I had spent the entire day watching and obsessing until I could barely think straight.  Then I ran my younger dog same course and my flatfootedness after the second red and six allowed her to go offcourse.  My not-so-new epiphany is that "dropping anchor" when my dog is going the wrong direction may well be how I cease COMMUNICATING to continue in the wrong direction, but it DOESN'T tell her what the right direction is.  I need to get moving in the right direction!

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